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Daniel Steinberg1 Sara Rodriguez Martinez1

1, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States

During summer 2018, the Princeton Center for Complex Materials gave 16 underrepresented high school students from Trenton and Princeton, New Jersey, the opportunity to learn materials science and its influences on and from society. Lectures and labs included discussions on sustainability, including the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, and coding from Princeton University professors and researchers. The Princeton University Materials Academy (PUMA) is an education outreach program for minority high school students and it is part of the Princeton Center for Complex Materials (PCCM), a National Science Foundation (NSF) funded Materials Research Engineering and Science Center (MRSEC). PUMA has been serving the community of Trenton for since 2002 each year providing daily lectures from Princeton Materials Science professors, workshops, tours and access to Princeton University laboratories, a glimpse into a real STEM academic environment. We have reached almost 300 students from 2002-2018, with many students repeating multiple years. 100% of our PUMA students have graduated high school and 98% have gone on for college, compared with the overall Trenton district graduation rate of 48% and a free and reduced lunch of 83%. This year, we discuss new initiatives and partnerships with Princeton’s makerspace “StudioLab”, a Princeton Council on Science and Technology space for collaboration and creation across disciplines (STEM, arts, humanities and social sciences), bringing in a coding and wearable technology production component to the program, while meeting Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). In addition to this, we will also discuss our launch of a new evaluation system with pre- and post- content and attitude tests. We also plan to share the curriculum online to enhance PCCM’s PUMA reach and to help teachers and high school students at a national level and improve diversity and accessibility in STEM.

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